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The Border Collies Essential Information

October 11, 2010 on 11:58 pm | In Collie | No Comments

The Border Collies Essential Information

Bred for their intelligence and herding instincts, Border Collies are descended from British herding dogs. A medium sized dog, Border Collies will grow to about 19 to 22 inches and 30 to 45 pounds. They will live about 12 to 15 years. Border Collies have medium to longer hair that comes in a variety of colors and are prone to shedding.


Border Collies need to be brushed regularly to keep the coat healthy and dirt free. Border Collies are also known for their stare. Though their eyes can be brown, amber or blue, it is the Border Collie stare that people remember. This is part of the herding instinct, and a Border Collie will attempt to herd almost anything, including cars and children.


Great care must be taken with a Border Collie to ensure it does not hurt itself or others. A fenced in yard and plenty of leash training is a must with this breed. Border Collies are easy to train due to their intelligence, but, because of their desire to work, Border Collies must have work to do. If they are not given tasks to perform and room to roam, they will become bored and destructive.


They must have a lot of stimulation and activity to stay happy. Though good with children, Border Collies may attempt to herd them and, to keep the ‘herd’ in line, Border Collies have been known to nip. Border Collies usually do not do well with other animals, due to their herding instinct, and can become aggressive with other dogs of the same gender.


Border Collies can be excellent household pets, but must be cared for by a family willing to give them the training, attention, care and activities they need. Border Collies are not recommended for people who live in apartments or those who do not plan on spending a lot of time with their pet.


Border Collies do have some breed specific issues. Some are prone to hip dysplasia, PRA (Progressive Retinal Atrophy) and Collie Eye Anomaly. Many Border Collies are allergic to fleas and some are prone to epilepsy and deafness. Osteochondritis Dissecans (OCD) is a shoulder lameness that can develop between the ages of 4 to 12 months. Border Collies have also been known to work themselves to exhaustion and suffer from heat stroke in the hot weather.


Because Border Collies are very physically active, they are prone to athletic injuries, such as pulled muscles, cruciate ligament ruptures, cuts and punctures, ripped toenails and footpads.

For more facts and info on the Border Collie or a full list of dog breeds take a look at this Dog Training website.

Border Collie – the Facts Every Owner of This Dog Breed Should Know

October 2, 2010 on 1:17 am | In Collie | 25 Comments

Border Collie – the Facts Every Owner of This Dog Breed Should Know

Bred for their intelligence and herding instincts, Border Collies are descended from British herding dogs. A medium sized dog, Border Collies will grow to about 19 to 22 inches and 30 to 45 pounds. They will live about 12 to 15 years. Border Collies have medium to longer hair that comes in a variety of colors and are prone to shedding. Border Collies need to be brushed regularly to keep the coat healthy and dirt free. Border Collies are also known for their stare. Though their eyes can be brown, amber or blue, it is the Border Collie stare that people remember. This is part of the herding instinct, and a Border Collie will attempt to herd almost anything, including cars and children.


Great care must be taken with a Border Collie to ensure it does not hurt itself or others. A fenced in yard and plenty of leash training is a must with this breed. Border Collies are easy to train due to their intelligence, but, because of their desire to work, Border Collies must have work to do. If they are not given tasks to perform and room to roam, they will become bored and destructive.


They must have a lot of stimulation and activity to stay happy. Though good with children, Border Collies may attempt to herd them and, to keep the ‘herd’ in line, Border Collies have been known to nip. Border Collies usually do not do well with other animals, due to their herding instinct, and can become aggressive with other dogs of the same gender. Border Collies can be excellent household pets, but must be cared for by a family willing to give them the training, attention, care and activities they need. Border Collies are not recommended for people who live in apartments or those who do not plan on spending a lot of time with their pet.


Border Collies do have some breed specific issues. Some are prone to hip dysplasia, PRA (Progressive Retinal Atrophy) and Collie Eye Anomaly. Many Border Collies are allergic to fleas and some are prone to epilepsy and deafness. Osteochondritis Dissecans (OCD) is a shoulder lameness that can develop between the ages of 4 to 12 months. Border Collies have also been known to work themselves to exhaustion and suffer from heat stroke in the hot weather.


Because Border Collies are very physically active, they are prone to athletic injuries, such as pulled muscles, cruciate ligament ruptures, cuts and punctures, ripped toenails and footpads.


There is a website that has great information on Border Collies and most other breeds of dogs. It has details that pertain to a dog breeds health, grooming, living conditions, best food choices and more, the website is called: Dog And Cat Facts, and can be found at this url:


http://www.dogandcatfacts.com


By Robert W. Benjamin


Copyright © 2006


You may publish this article in your ezine, newsletter on your web site as long as it is reprinted in its entirety and without modification except for formatting needs or grammar corrections.

Robert W. Benjamin has been in the software business on the internet for over 5 years, and has been producing low-cost software for the past 25+ years. He first released products on the AMIGA and C64 computer systems in the late 1970’s-80’s.


RB59 Software


http://www.rb59.com/software

This is video of my collie. Hofflane’s Midnight Kid
Video Rating: 4 / 5

How much would a male border collie weigh at 10 months to 1 years old?

September 29, 2010 on 6:43 pm | In Collie | 4 Comments

Question by Tom: How much would a male border collie weigh at 10 months to 1 years old?
I am looking at getting a border collie for my townhouse next year. I’ve done a lot of research on it and will be able to give it plenty of exercise. My townhouse rules, though, prohibit dogs over 25 lbs. I will graduate from college and be on my own in a year where I can get less lenient rules, but will a border collie be under 25 lbs at 1 year old.

Best answer:

Answer by livin life
I would think they are about 35-40 lbs full grown

What do you think? Answer below!

An Ideal Collie – The Characteristics Of A Perfect Collie

August 26, 2010 on 10:01 pm | In Collie | No Comments

An Ideal Collie – The Characteristics Of A Perfect Collie

The Collie is an excellent sports dog. What’s more, it can be taught the skills that are natural in other breeds. Hence, a collie can work like a Setter or Pointer as well as the Golden Retriever or the Water Spaniel. Collies are expert hunters, have a great sense of smell, and can kill vermin. In addition, they are faithful friends and fierce watchdogs. It is not only agile but also easy to manage.

The Greatness of the Collie

Not much is known about the history of the Collie. Its appearance shows that it was once related to the wild dog. Buffon says that the collie is a real dog of nature, a model for the entire species of dogs. He believed that the Collie has superior instincts and more intelligence than all the other breeds put together. Buffon goes to the extent of saying that a collie is born trained perfectly to give service to human beings.

At dog shows, the Collie proves that it is a world-class dog. The smooth-coated breed of Collie is a very hardy dog, useful, swift-footed, and well adapted to work on the hills. This breed is not as sweet-tempered as the black and white breed of Collie and takes its time to make friends. The show Collie is the loveliest and most elegant breed available. A descendant of the old working Collie, this breed is now in a class of its own.

What a Dog Show Expects of a Collie

The Collie should have a flat skull, and the width between its ears should be moderate, tapering gradually toward its eyes. The depression on the top of its head should be slight. The width of a Collie’s skull should be in proportion with the overall length of its muzzle and skull. A Collie’s head should be proportionate with the rest of its body. Its cheek should be neither prominent nor full.

The Collie should have a muzzle of fair length, which should taper to its nose, and show no sign of weakness. The dog could be of any color, but its nose should be black. Its teeth should be even sized, healthy, and level. The judges at the show, however, don’t mind if the teeth are slightly uneven. Its jaws should be powerful and clear-cut.

The Collie’s eyes are its most important features. They give the dog its character and personality. The dog’s eyes should be medium sized, slightly slanting, almond-shaped, and brown in color. In Merles, however, the eyes could be white and blue. The Collie’s eyes should brim with intelligence and look alert when it is listening.

It should have small ears that are of moderate width at their bases. The ears should not be placed too close to each other. They should be place atop the skull, not at the sides of its head. When the dog is relaxed, it ears should be slightly held back. When it is alert, the ears should be brought forward, half-erect, with its tips slightly drooping.

The Collie’s neck should be powerful, muscular, slighly arched, and of moderate length. Its should have a strong body with a deep chest, fairly broad at the shoulders. The shoulders should be sloping and the loins should be strong. The Collie should have a straight front.

It should have muscular and strong fore-legs, neither out nor in at its elbows. The forearm should be a little fleshy and have a fair quantity of bone. Its pasterns should reflect flexibility, not weakness. Its hind-legs, at the thighs, should be muscular; below the hocks, they should be sinewly; and the stifles should be well bent. It should have oval feet, well padded soles, and arched toes, set close to one another.

The Collie’s legs should be fairly lengthy, giving it a racy, not cloddy, appearance. The looks of an ideal Collie indicate endurance, an active nature, and intelligence. The ideal Collie dog is 22 to 24 inches at the shoulders while the bitch is 20 to 22 inches. While dogs should ideally weight between 45 and 65 lbs, bitches should weigh between 40 and 55 lbs.

The only difference between the smooth Collie and the rough Collie is their coats. Ideally, a Collie’s coat should be tough, thick, and smooth.

The Collie is an active, smart dog. Its deep chest is indicative of great lung power. Its sloping shoulders, strong neck, and well bent hock are all built to enable great speed. It wears an expression of great intelligence.

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The Right Companion: Collie

August 14, 2010 on 6:28 am | In Collie | No Comments

www.janson.com Finally, all of our favorite dogs – on one DVD! This indispensable “visual guidebook” is not just for prospective dog owners, but for dog lovers in general.
Video Rating: 4 / 5

 

   
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