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The Scottie – Your Loyal Guardian

October 30, 2010 on 11:08 pm | In Scottish Terrier (Scottie) | No Comments

The Scottie – Your Loyal Guardian

Scottish terriers, commonly called Scotties, are British terriers with short legs. They originated in the Scottish highlands where they were bred with the other terriers related to them. They are such jaunty creatures that they are often used in advertisements to represent the nature of the country of their origin.

In reality, the nature of the Scottie perfectly matches its public image. Scottties are extremely loyal to their owners, in addition to being stoic and independant. They also value their privacy.

Scotties, Cairns, and Westies resemble one another a lot. The Cairns and Westies are closely related to each other. The Cairns are available in any color except white. The Westie, on the other hand, is actually a white Cairn, born when white dogs were crossed with the Cairns of west Scotland. Scotties are slightly different in the sense that they have dark coats, long heads and bodies, and usually stay aloof from the other two.

The History of the Scottie

The story of the Scottie’s origin is unclear. In the sixteenth century, the Scottie’s ancestors were sent to the king of France by the English king, James I. Later, three varieties of terriers were identified as Scotch terriers–the Cairns, the Scotties, and the Westies. The Dandie Dinmont, although related to these three breeds, has been placed in a class of its own because of the differences in its physical appearance.

Britain bred terriers to hunt animals that destroyed grain, poultry, and eggs. The terriers, therefore, evolved to be courageous dogs that could hunt foxes and badgers right upto their dens. Moreover, their soft undercoats and wiry outer coats protected them as they hunted in rough locations in harsh climatic conditions.

Interesting Facts about Your Scottie

You will be happy to know the following facts about your Scottie:

They are comfortable both indoors as well as outdoors.
They have a wiry coat about 2-inches thick.
Their color could be steel or iron gray, black, wheat, or sandy; sometimes, it is also grizzled or brindled.
They are about 10 inches tall.
They weight from 18 to 20 pounds.
They love to be praised and adapt well to the nature and habits of the family that owns them.

Caring for Your Scottie

Here are a few things that should be done regularly to keep your Scottie in a good condition:

Give your Scottie a professional grooming twice a year. Their wiry coats require professional care to maintain their texture and appearance. A good grooming will keep the coats wiry and firm.
Comb their fur twice a week and trim it occassionally.
Pluck out the dead hairs of a Scottie. Don’t use electric clippers because this will make their coats soft and dull.
They love hunting and playing with toys such as squeaky balls. Ensure that you spend some time playing with your Scottie.
Keep your Scottie on a leash when you take it for a walk in the public.

If you own or breed Scotties, you should be aware that the breed is susceptible to the following disorders:
An inherited disease called Von Willibrand’s Disease (VWD)
Allergies to fleas and other skin disorders
Epilepsy
Disorders of the jawbone
Cramps, a minor disorder that makes it difficult for your Scottie to walk.
Loss of coordination caused by a rare neurological disorder called Cerebellar abiotrophy that progress slowly.

Do you wish to buy a Scottie for yourself? Think over the matter carefully, and don’t make any hasty decision. Cruelty to the animal and lack of training can only cause distress to it. However, if you take good care of your Scottie, it will become your loyal guardian. In fact, it can become so protective that it will protect you even though it implies danger to its own life. A Scottie, in this regard, is the only dog of its kind.

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Scottish Terrier Puppy And Dog Information

October 6, 2010 on 9:45 pm | In Scottish Terrier (Scottie) | No Comments

Scottish Terrier Puppy And Dog Information

The Scottish Terrier tends to be a one person or several person dog. They prefer cooler climates and moderate exercise. Daily long walks or a properly fenced in yard will accommodate their exercise needs. They are known to be diggers and they will wander off, given a chance, so be sure she is kept secure. They need to be extensively socialized with other pets and older children. As a reminder, never leave a child unsupervised with a puppy or dog.


*Approximate Adult Size. The approximate adult size (two years old or older) of the Scottish Terrier is 10 to 11 inches to the withers (highest point of the shoulder) and 19 to 23 pounds.


*Special Health Considerations. Most dog breeds have certain inherited health problems associated with that specific breed and the Scottish Terrier is no exception. Be on the look out for Scottie Cramp, Von Willebrands disease (a problem with blood clotting), skin allergies, Craniomandibular Ossteopathy and bladder and kidney stones. This breed is known to be difficult welpers. This disease list is an informative guideline only. Other diseases may also be significant threats, please contact your veterinarian for a complete list.


She should visit the veterinarian several times in the first year for shots, boosters and check up. Then, as an adult, she should visit the veterinarian yearly for shots and check up. As she gets older, six years and on, she should visit the veterinarian twice a year for check ups and shots. Remember; avoid feeding your dog sweets.


*Grooming. The Scottish Terrier has a harsh, wiry coat with a dense, soft undercoat. They need to be professionally groomed several times a year.


Her teeth should be brushed at least twice a week with toothpaste and toothbrush designed for dogs. Brushing removes the accumulation of plaque and tartar which can cause cavities (rarely) and periodontal disease. Dog periodontal disease can lead to pain, loss of teeth, bad breath and other serious disease.


Her toenails may need to be examined for growth and clipped regularly. The toenails of the rear feet grow slower than the toenails of the front feet.


*Life Span. The Scottish Terrier can live between 12 and 14 years with proper nutrition, medical care and excellent living conditions.


*History. The Scottish Terrier comes from Scotland where they were used to kill vermin.They were first registered by the American Kennel Association in 1885.


Some Registries:

*Scottish Terrier Club of America

*UKC United Kennel Club

*NKC National Kennel Club

*CKC Continental Kennel Club

*APRI Americas Pet Registry Inc.

*AKC American Kennel Club

*FCI Federation Cynologique Internationale

*NZKC New Zealand Kennel Club

*KCGB = Kennel Club of Great Britain

*ANKC = Australian National Kennel Club

*ACR = American Canine Registry


Litter Size: 3 to 5 Scottish Terrier puppies


Category: Terrier


Terms To Describe: Small, compact, confident, bold, dignified, powerful, brave, alert, protective, lovable, stubborn


*SPECIAL GOOD POINTS

Makes a very good watch dog.

Intelligent dog.

Sheds very little.


*SPECIAL BAD POINTS

They love to dig.

Can be very stubborn.

Can be a one person dog.

Can bark excessively.

Makes a poor guard dog.

May wander off.


*Other Names Known By: Aberdeen Terrier


*Every dog is an individual so not everything in this information may be correct for your dog. This information is meant as a good faith guideline only.

Mitch Endick is a short article writer, editor and website developer for the popular pet site petpages.com.
www.petpages.com is a pet information site with free pet ads, dog classifieds, and puppy for sale info Petpages.com also offers information on cats, fish, reptiles, birds, ferrets, rabbits, mice and even pet bugs.

Dogs: the Stylish and Reserved Dog: Scottish Terrier

September 23, 2010 on 12:28 am | In Scottish Terrier (Scottie) | No Comments

Dogs: the Stylish and Reserved Dog: Scottish Terrier

The Scottish terriers, also known as Scotties, are short-legged British terriers.  They are one among other go-to-ground and wire-coated terriers developed in the highlands of Scotland. The Scotties are said to have jaunty attitude so they are often used to represent advertisements of the country to where they originated.

However, Scotties’ nature is not in coherence with their public image or trademark.  In fact, Scotties are like the citizens of his native land who are independent, stoic, and fiercely loyal to their masters.  They also adhere much to their own privacy.

Scotties, Westies, and Cairns are very similar regarding their appearance. The Westies and the Cairns are, in fact, closely-related. The Westie can be considered as the white variety of the Cairn who has a coat of any color but white. Westies are hybrids of white dogs crossed with Cairns of western Scotland. Scotties, however, have longer heads and bodies, have generally dark coats and are aloof than the other two.

The following are some of the basic facts breeders would really love to know about Scotties:

Category: Terrier

Living Environment: either outdoor or indoor (mostly preferred by breeders)

Coat: wiry, short (about 2 inches) and thick

Colors: iron gray or steel, black, wheaten, or sandy; the coat may also be brindled or grizzled

Height: about 10 inches

Weight: between 18 and 20 pounds

Temperament: they need to be praised frequently and they adapt with the moods of the household

Breeders should note of the following health issues:
•       Von Willibrand’s disease (VWD), an inherited disorder
•       Flea allergies and other skin problems
•       Epilepsy
•       Jawbone disorders
•       Scottie cramp, a minor condition that causes walking difficulties
•       Cerebellar abiotrophy, a slow-to-progress and rare neurological disease that causes loss of coordination

Care and Exercise:
•    Their coats need special care to maintain its appearance and texture. It is suggested that they should be subjected to professional grooming once or twice each year for their coats to stay wiry and firm. 
•    The fur needs to be combed a couple of times in each week and even needs occasional trimming.
•    Scotties’ dead hairs should be plucked out through stripping. Using electric clippers will only make their coats dull and soft.
•    Play with them. Hunting and squeaky balls and toys are their favorites.
•    They should be on leash while walking in public places.

Origin/History:

The origins of the breed are obscure. It was noted that forerunners of Scotties were sent to France’s Royal Highness by King James I of England during the 16th century. Later on, three different terriers were revealed as Scotch Terriers, which included the Westies, the Cairns, and the Scotties. The Dandie Dinmont variety had also been noted as closely-related to the abovementioned terriers but its apparent physical differences categorized itself as a separate breed.

Terrier dogs that were bred in Britain were developed to hunt vermin that ate grains, and pestered eggs and poultry farms. Most breeds grew as scrappy and courageous dogs and were trained to follow badgers or foxes into their dens. Their wiry coats and soft undercoats protected them against rugged terrains and harsh climates.

If you want to have a Scottie in your life, you should not be impulsive about the matter for animosity and lack of proper training will only harm and traumatize the dog. If properly taken cared of, this breed can even appoint itself as a guardian of the family. It can also be fiercely loyal, that is it can protect you even if it means endangering its own life.

To this effect, I guess you must agree that a Scottie is a dog that is second to none.

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Scottish Terrier Dog

September 18, 2010 on 9:29 am | In Scottish Terrier (Scottie) | 25 Comments

Scottish Terrier Dog

The Scottish Terrier, most commonly known as the Scottie, although sometimes it is called the Aberdeen Terrier, is a short and sturdy dog. With a height of 9 to 11 inches and weighing between 18 and 23 pounds, they are obviously fairly muscular for their size. Because these dogs have naturally long hair, the grooming can make it look as though they have even shorter legs than they actually do. The hair on their face can grow quite long and when groomed looks almost as though they have a large moustache, somewhat typical of the stereotyped ‘what ho Biffo’ World War II pilot (so often seen in comedy sketches), and their long eyebrows only exaggerate this perception. They have a coarse and compact coat which is quite wiry and firm, and can feel like hard bristles.

History. The Scottish Terrier was, as you may expect, first bred in Scotland, in the 1700s. Originally named Aberdeen Terrier, after the Scottish city, this is a particularly old breed, and parts of its history are steeped in myth and legend, as there is little to no supporting documentary evidence, although, a breed of dog whose description matched the Scottish Terrier was written about in 1436.

Temperament. The Scottish Terrier breed is generally lovable, hardy, and brave. Being full of character and playful, they mature into dignified and charming adults. They make good watchdogs and will alert you to any problems they perceive. They train quite well, but can be stubborn and have been known to dig their heels in. They tend to be sensitive to criticism, and need to be handled in a gentle but firm fashion. As an intelligent dog they require to know who the master is, they must not be allowed to think they are in charge or this could lead to endless problems in later life. When training or handling this dog any command given must be in a manner that shows you mean it, and you must mean it or the dog will know, and may just ignore you. Whilst this is a very playful dog and loves nothing more than to dash about; care must be taken not to play particularly aggressive or combative games, such as challenging the dog to rope tugging. However such games can be played with members of the family who are not his master, this is because the dog may see the contest as a leadership challenge, if conducted by the person he sees as the pack leader.

Health issues. The Scottish Terrier can suffer from a fairly unique illness called Scottie Cramp (which is a problem in movements). Also are prone to Von Willebrand’s disease, jaw problems, skin conditions, and flea allergies. Their life expectancy is 12 to 15 years.

Grooming. The Scottish Terrier will require brushing regularly, of their wiry coat, during moulting more care should be taken and brushing to be more frequent. Bathing can be conducted as necessary or dry shampooing. Their hair will require being trimed professionally twice a year. Apart from when they are moulting they tend to shed little hair, if any at all.

Living conditions. While the Scottish Terrier prefers cooler climates, it is very happy living in most homes. They are entertaining and get on very well with children, and as they are fairly small, they are unlikely to knock people over. As long as they are adequately exercised they will take well to living in an apartment.

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sweet little Twinkle plays with Midnight.
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Scottish Terrier – Dog Breed Info

September 1, 2010 on 10:16 am | In Scottish Terrier (Scottie) | No Comments

Scottish Terrier – Dog Breed Info

The Scottish Terriers, or “Scotties” as they are affectionately known are a beautiful breed of terriers that were bred in the Scottish Highlands. These jaunty likeable dogs have a wonderful step and look to them. They are very sensitive, however to any form of correction. These guys love to walk and make excellent apartment dwellers. These guys need exercise and can develop temperament troubles if not being exercised daily. They also do well in a fenced in yard. Play is vital for a happy Scottie to keep happy and healthy. As a puppy, they are boisterous, but as an adult, they become more serious.


These guys come in black, brindle and tan. The black form is the one that is most identified with these lovable terriers. This being said, this breed is solid and is short, with a long wiry coat. Their top coat isn’t so wiry. Constant brushing of their coat is necessary to remove buildup of hair in the outer and inner coat. This prevents matted hair and making the terrier miserable in the heat of some places. They do have a temperament of being happy but can snap at people. However, this trait isn’t as pronounced as it is with many of the other terrier breeds.


These dogs are good watch dogs and are used as such in a variety of ways. They are also used for fox hunting as well as chasing vermin. This wonderful dog is a spirited and very faithful companion. There are many examples of famous people that own Scotties. George Bush is one that comes to mind. These lovable dogs offer fantastic companionship and friendship. That bond can be broken though with or through mistreatment or harsh attempts to correct them. Bear this in mind when selecting a Scottie for your very own.


They are wonderful indoor dogs as well. These wonderful terriers can become close companions to you and provide a long lasting, lifetime friendship. Feeding and care of your Scottie is essential to a happy, healthy, well behaved dog. Keep all vet appointments and shots to keep your Scottie healthy for long years of companionship. In the end, your relationship with the Scottie is life enriching, long term friendship. You couldn’t ask for better in a loyal companion. This also goes for any children that you may have. They also will have a long term companion for as long as they live.

For more information on the Scottish Terrier or a full list of dog breeds take a look at this Dog Training website.

The Stylish and Reserved Dog: Scottish Terrier

August 30, 2010 on 12:46 pm | In Scottish Terrier (Scottie) | No Comments

The Stylish and Reserved Dog: Scottish Terrier

The Scottish terriers, also known as Scotties, are short-legged British terriers. They are one among other go-to-ground and wire-coated terriers developed in the highlands of Scotland. The Scotties are said to have jaunty attitude so they are often used to represent advertisements of the country to where they originated.

However, Scotties’ nature is not in coherence with their public image or trademark. In fact, Scotties are like the citizens of his native land who are independent, stoic, and fiercely loyal to their masters. They also adhere much to their own privacy.

Scotties, Westies, and Cairns are very similar regarding their appearance. The Westies and the Cairns are, in fact, closely-related. The Westie can be considered as the white variety of the Cairn who has a coat of any color but white. Westies are hybrids of white dogs crossed with Cairns of western Scotland. Scotties, however, have longer heads and bodies, have generally dark coats and are aloof than the other two.

The following are some of the basic facts breeders would really love to know about Scotties:

Category: Terrier

Living Environment: either outdoor or indoor (mostly preferred by breeders)

Coat: wiry, short (about 2 inches) and thick Colors: iron gray or steel, black, wheaten, or sandy; the coat may also be brindled or grizzled

Height: about 10 inches

Weight: between 18 and 20 pounds

Temperament: they need to be praised frequently and they adapt with the moods of the household

Breeders should note of the following health issues: • Von Willibrand’s disease (VWD), an inherited disorder • Flea allergies and other skin problems • Epilepsy • Jawbone disorders • Scottie cramp, a minor condition that causes walking difficulties • Cerebellar abiotrophy, a slow-to-progress and rare neurological disease that causes loss of coordination

Care and Exercise: • Their coats need special care to maintain its appearance and texture. It is suggested that they should be subjected to professional grooming once or twice each year for their coats to stay wiry and firm. • The fur needs to be combed a couple of times in each week and even needs occasional trimming. • Scotties’ dead hairs should be plucked out through stripping. Using electric clippers will only make their coats dull and soft. • Play with them. Hunting and squeaky balls and toys are their favorites. • They should be on leash while walking in public places.

Origin/History:

The origins of the breed are obscure. It was noted that forerunners of Scotties were sent to France’s Royal Highness by King James I of England during the 16th century. Later on, three different terriers were revealed as Scotch Terriers, which included the Westies, the Cairns, and the Scotties. The Dandie Dinmont variety had also been noted as closely-related to the abovementioned terriers but its apparent physical differences categorized itself as a separate breed.

Terrier dogs that were bred in Britain were developed to hunt vermin that ate grains, and pestered eggs and poultry farms. Most breeds grew as scrappy and courageous dogs and were trained to follow badgers or foxes into their dens. Their wiry coats and soft undercoats protected them against rugged terrains and harsh climates.

If you want to have a Scottie in your life, you should not be impulsive about the matter for animosity and lack of proper training will only harm and traumatize the dog. If properly taken cared of, this breed can even appoint itself as a guardian of the family. It can also be fiercely loyal, that is it can protect you even if it means endangering its own life.

To this effect, I guess you must agree that a Scottie is a dog that is second to none.

To learn about house training a dog and how to stop dog barking, visit The Dog Trainer.

Scottish terriers, or Scottie dogs, are sporty and independent, and tend to do better in quiet households with one or two people. Care for a Scottish terrier’s coat by getting it professionally groomed withadvice from a certified dog trainer in this free video on pet care and obedience. Expert: Nancy Frensley Contact: www.berkeleyhumane.org/ Bio: Nancy Frensley is a certified pet dog trainer. Filmmaker: Sam Lee

how do i teach my 2 and a half year old scottish terrier(scottie)not to chase my parakeets and rabbits?

August 29, 2010 on 1:49 pm | In Scottish Terrier (Scottie) | 5 Comments

Question by Somara: how do i teach my 2 and a half year old scottish terrier(scottie)not to chase my parakeets and rabbits?
well i have a 2 and a half year old scottie and she just met me and came home on nov.26.08 from being uplifted her 2nd time to my home and she just met my pet parakeets and rabbits.the scottie is known for hunting and i’m almost forced to get rid of my parakeets and rabbits!so how do i teach her not to chase them?

Best answer:

Answer by oddishkennels
good luck with that not only are scotties good vermon hunters they are very head strong I don’t think you will ever be able to teach it to stop they are very headstrong that is why you do not see many of them around not many people can handle their stubborness

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

Reserved Dog Scottish Terrier

August 26, 2010 on 12:21 am | In Scottish Terrier (Scottie) | 19 Comments

Reserved Dog Scottish Terrier

The Scottish terriers, also known as Scotties, are sharply-legged British terriers. They are one among other go-to-ground and wire-layered terriers urbanized in the highlands of Scotland. The Scotties are said to have jolly position so they are regularly used to epitomize advertisements of the country to where they originated.

However, Scotties’ scenery is not in reason with their known image or trademark. In truth, Scotties are like the citizens of his native land who are independent, stoic, and angrily loyal to their masters. They also adhere much to their own privacy.

Scotties, Westies, and Cairns are very analogous regarding their appearance. The Westies and the Cairns are, in statement, compactly-linked. The Westie can be considered as the pasty strain of the Cairn who has a coat of any blush but sallow. Westies are hybrids of fair dogs crossed with Cairns of western Scotland. Scotties, however, have longer heads and bodies, have normally unhappy coats and are proud than the other two.

The next are some of the principal proof breeders would sincerely love to understand Scotties Category: Terrier Living Environment: both outdoor or interior (generally chosen by breeders) Coat: unbending, tiny (about 2 inches) and thick Colors: iron colorless or steel, black, wheaten, or dirty; the coat may also be brindled or grizzled Height: about 10 inches Weight: between 18 and 20 pounds
Temperament: the hardship to be praised frequently and they adapt with the moods of the household.

Breeders should reminder of the next strength issues: Von Willibrand’s disease (VWD), an inherited disorder Flea allergies and other skin harms Epilepsy Jawbone disorders Scottie cramp, a juvenile order that causes walking difficulties Cerebellar abiotrophy, a thick-to-evolve and bloody neurological disease that causes passing of coordination

Care and Exercise: Their coats poverty unique nurture to continue its appearance and texture. It is optional that they should be subjected to professional grooming once or twice each year for their coats to halt stiff and secure. The fur wishes to be combed a connect of period in each week and even needs occasional extra. Scotties’ departed hairs should be plucked out through stripping. Using emotional cutters will only make their coats dull and elastic. Play with them. Hunting and noisy balls and toys are their favorites. They should be on harness while walking in municipal spaces.

The origins of the breed shroud. It was famous the forerunners of Scotties were sent to France’s Royal Highness by King James I of England during the 16th century. Later, three different terriers were naked as Scotch Terriers, which included the Westies, the Cairns, and the Scotties. The Dandie Dinmont strain had also been famous as compactly-allied to the abovementioned terriers but its apparent physical differences categorized itself as a withdraw breed.

Terrier dogs that were bred in Britain were urbanized to chart parasites that ate grains, and pestered eggs and poultry farms. Most breeds grew as scrappy and courageous dogs and were trained to follow badgers or foxes into their dens. Their tough coats and flexible undercoats cosseted them against uneven terrains and harsh climates.

If you want to have a Scottie in your life, you should not be reckless about the substance for dislike and need of good exercise will only hurt and traumatize the dog. If suitably taken cared of, this breed can even appoint itself as a protector of the family. It could also be violently loyal, that is it can defend you even if it means endangering its own life.

To this produce, I presume you must approve that a Scottie is a dog that support to nothing.

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Mac’s vet one day said “show me your razors!” and he shows us his razors often. He’s a shy boy, and this is his way of saying hi.

Scottish Terrier Puppy Playing Ball – Samstevever Scottie

August 19, 2010 on 5:15 am | In Scottish Terrier (Scottie) | No Comments

Our 5 Month old Scottie, Scrumpy play, or rather attacking our daughters ball. Sounds very fierce for such a bundle of fun. Lovely natured Scottie from Samstevever kennels in Cornwall.

 

   
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